Moving home is said to be one of the most traumatic experiences of our lives, along with marriage, divorce and unexpected pregnancy. As if relocating didn’t carry enough of a burden, the government also asks for Stamp Duty as part of the process, although it has never explained why. However, some things don’t change, so we are here to help, with our simple residential Stamp Duty Calculator.

Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) Calculator

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Our calculator is simple to use – just key in the price of either your main or an additional property and you will know the properties stamp duty cost in seconds. Including a full breakdown based on price band.

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Our Stamp Duty Calculator Is Simple To Use

Just key in the price of either your main or an additional property and you will know the cost in seconds. We also bring you all the information you will need about paying Stamp Duty tax when buying a property, plus all the latest information as the rates of duty that inevitably change with every budget or with changes in government policy.

Stamp Duty rates in the UK (except Scotland) for a single home is based on a sliding scale, starting at 2% of the purchase price for properties selling at more than £125,000, increasing to 12% for any property that is sold for more than £1.5 million. Any additional property will incur an extra 3% for a selling price of more than £40,000.

Properties in Scotland are subject to the same levies, but the scale varies slightly to that in the rest of the UK, in line with the property market there. Duty in Scotland begins, for a single property, at £145,000, with the top rate of 12% applying to properties selling for £750,000 and above. This is explained in greater detail in our section on buying property in Scotland.

You’ve come to the best site for information on all aspects of paying tax when buying property, whether upsizing, downsizing or for any other reason. As tax changes vary often, and some announcements of changes don’t come into force until 12 months later, it is essential to keep up with any developments that have occurred or will happen at a later date.